Category Archives: Newsletter

The 100th AEJMC Annual Conference, 2017 Paper Call

Closing the Gap: Media, Research and the Profession

2017 Paper Call

The Communication Technology Division encourages research submissions where the central focus is technology and changes in the communication process resulting from technology. The division welcomes theoretical and conceptual papers as well as a diversity of methodological approaches from both faculty and students.

Student Paper Competition: Papers solely authored by students are especially encouraged. These papers are eligible to be entered for the Jung-Sook Lee Student Paper competition. The Jung-Sook Lee Award recognizes the best student paper, which makes “a substantial contribution to the substance or method on a topic related to communication technology.” The award honors the division’s 1997-1998 research chair, Jung-Sook Lee of the University of Southwestern Louisiana, who died soon after the 1998 conference. Authors of the top three student papers will receive a cash award. In addition, the author of the best student paper will have his or her conference registration fee paid by the division. For a paper to be considered for this award, ALL authors must be undergraduate or graduate students enrolled during the 2016-2017 academic year. Papers submitted by student-only authors must type “Jung-Sook Lee Competition” on the title page to be considered for the award.

Faculty Paper Competition: The division is pleased to present the annual Gene Burd Top Faculty Research Paper Award, made possible by the generosity of Prof. Burd from the University of Texas – Austin. The $1,000 award recognizes the best faculty paper submitted to the division. For a paper to be considered for this award at least one of the authors must be faculty. To be eligible, authors must indicate “faculty submission” on the title page.

Winners of both awards will receive their prize and be recognized at the conference. Submissions that do not win recognition in the Jung-Sook Lee Award or the Gene Burd Award are still considered for acceptance along with open competition submissions.

Please limit papers to no more than 30 pages (double-spaced) in length, including title page, abstract, tables, figures, references, and notes. Papers should follow the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition), have 1-inch margins, and use 12 point Times New Roman, Times or Arial font. Abstracts must be no more than 75 words. The title should be on the first page with page numbers and running heads on each page of text. Be sure that submissions contain no identifying information, such as name, university affiliation, job title, etc., either in the text of the paper or in the document properties. Please be sure to submit a clean paper without author identifying information, otherwise the paper will be disqualified. Please refer to AEJMC’s uniform paper call on how to upload clean papers.

If you have any questions or require more information about the submission process, please contact Pamela Brubaker, CTEC research chair, at pamela_brubaker@byu.edu.

Paper Call

Best of the Web 2017 Competition

This year’s deadline is right around the corner. For those of you who may be unfamiliar with this competition, here’s an overview of the contest guidelines, how to apply, and some examples from last year’s winners.

How to submit:

The competition website will launch around March 8 and will be located here: http://www.bestofweb17.com/ Submission deadline is April 16, 2017.

What is Best of the Web?

The competition is an annual web and app design contest co-sponsored by the Communication Technology and Visual Communication Divisions of the Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication (AEJMC). Web or app entries submitted to this competition must advance education or research in journalism and/or mass communication. The contest is open to faculty and students who work for or attend an institution that is accredited by AEJMC, or are current members of AEJMC.

Overview

Projects may be entered in one of four categories:

  • Individual/Team/Single class designation for web and app

The individual/team/single class categories consist of entries that have been designed and created by an individual, a small team or a single class.

  • Multiple class/Institution designation for web and app

The multiple class/institution categories consist of entries that have been designed and created by several classes collaborating on a single project or by a school or department collaborating on a single project.

Web and app design professionals and academics with a background in web and app design technology will be judging the competition. Judging primarily focuses on the design, presentation and technological components of the project.

Examples of last year’s winners
As the first place winner in the individual/team/single class website category, Dome 35 takes a comprehensive look at Syracuse University’s Carrier Dome, one of the best-known collegiate stadiums in the country, during its 35th year of operations. The site showcases the work of 25 junior, senior and graduate student journalists enrolled in the Newhouse School’s Web Journalism & Innovation class.

Their projects revolve around five main topics: sports, people, the building, events and community. Content explored in the class and used in the project includes 360-degree video, time-lapse video, social-media engagement, and data scraping, analysis and visualization.

In the multiple class/institution category, the Memphis Mirror website is a project of the Multimedia News Lab, the capstone news journalism class at the University of Memphis. According to the website, the “goal of the project is to hold a mirror to the city of Memphis and reflect the various cultures, religions, identities, abilities and truths the city has to offer.” The project uses audio, video, maps, photography and infographics.

Please spread the word among your colleagues and students and encourage them to submit entries. If anyone has questions, I’m available via email at szake@kent.edu.

See you in Chicago!

Susan Zake

2017 CTEC Chair, Best of the Web

Letter from the Division Head

Hello everyone,

It has been a busy year for Communication Technology Division.

The first update is about the CTEC journal. Several past CTEC heads has been working on the journal. Past Head Jacob Groshek continues to work on the journal and is setting up the website to receive submissions. Second, Vice Head Jessica Smith has worked with several divisions to put together some fantastic panels for the annual meeting.

We had a great response to the MidWinter conference call and Cindy Vincent, our MidWinter Chair has worked diligently for a fabulous meeting in March.

We have been able to keep in touch digitally via Facebook and Twitter and I hope you will continue to stay part of the conversation.  We are always grateful for the service you provide to the division as reviewers and discussants, and for your involvement in our presentations. Thank you all so much.

Sincerely,

Porismita Borah CTEC-Head

Assistant Professor, Edward R. Murrow College of Communication

Washington State University

AEJMC CTEC Paper Call

The 100th AEJMC Annual Conference

Closing the Gap: Media, Research and the Profession
2017 Paper Call

The Communication Technology Division encourages research submissions where the central focus is technology and changes in the communication process resulting from technology. The division welcomes theoretical and conceptual papers as well as a diversity of methodological approaches from both faculty and students.

Student Paper Competition: Papers solely authored by students are especially encouraged. These papers are eligible to be entered for the Jung-Sook Lee Student Paper competition. The Jung-Sook Lee Award recognizes the best student paper, which makes “a substantial contribution to the substance or method on a topic related to communication technology.” The award honors the division’s 1997-1998 research chair, Jung-Sook Lee of the University of Southwestern Louisiana, who died soon after the 1998 conference. Authors of the top three student papers will receive a cash award. In addition, the author of the best student paper will have his or her conference registration fee paid by the division. For a paper to be considered for this award, ALL authors must be undergraduate or graduate students enrolled during the 2016-2017 academic year. Papers submitted by student-only authors must type “Jung-Sook Lee Competition” on the title page to be considered for the award.

Faculty Paper Competition: The division is pleased to present the annual Gene Burd Top Faculty Research Paper Award, made possible by the generosity of Prof. Burd from the University of Texas – Austin. The $1,000 award recognizes the best faculty paper submitted to the division. For a paper to be considered for this award at least one of the authors must be faculty. To be eligible, authors must indicate “faculty submission” on the title page.

Winners of both awards will receive their prize and be recognized at the conference. Submissions that do not win recognition in the Jung-Sook Lee Award or the Gene Burd Award are still considered for acceptance along with open competition submissions.

Please limit papers to no more than 30 pages (double-spaced) in length, including title page, abstract, tables, figures, references, and notes. Papers should follow the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition), have 1-inch margins, and use 12 point Times New Roman, Times or Arial font. Abstracts must be no more than 75 words. The title should be on the first page with page numbers and running heads on each page of text. Be sure that submissions contain no identifying information, such as name, university affiliation, job title, etc., either in the text of the paper or in the document properties. Please be sure to submit a clean paper without author identifying information, otherwise the paper will be disqualified. Please refer to AEJMC’s uniform paper call on how to upload clean papers.

If you have any questions or require more information about the submission process, please contact Pamela Brubaker, CTEC research chair, at pamela_brubaker@byu.edu.

AEJMC Annual Meeting Paper Submission Tips

Here are a few guidelines to remember while making your AEJMC submission. If you are submitting using Word, you can check Felicia’s instructions for ensuring blind review. She has clear instructions for many programs/operating systems. Here is the link:

http://www.aejmc.org/home/wp-content/ uploads/2013/12/Ensure-a-Blind-Review.pdf

But if you are uploading a pdf file, it might not very easy to ensure blind review. Remember that your PDF may also have author information. To remove this, take the following step.

  • If you have Acrobat Pro: Click “Tools” in the tab on the right, then go down to the “Protection”section, and click “Remove Hidden Information.
  • If you do not have Acrobat Pro, but have Safari or Firefox: Open your PDF using your browser. Go to File > Print, and in the Print dialog box, click “PDF” in the bottom left. This will save your file as a new PDF, but allow you to edit the title and author info manually (delete the Author Name here).
  • If neither option above works for you (and you still want to submit a PDF), you can download a free third-party PDF creator, and re-create your PDF while saving the information in there.”

Hope this information will be useful for you as you prepare to submit your papers for AEJMC.

AEJMC Call for Papers

The Communication Technology Division encourages research submissions where the central focus is technology and changes in the communication process resulting from technology. The division welcomes theoretical and conceptual papers and a diversity of methodological approaches.

Student Papers:

Papers solely authored by students are especially encouraged and are eligible to be entered for the Jung- Sook Lee Student Paper competition. The Jung-Sook Lee Award recognizes the best student paper, which makes “a substantial contribution to the substance or method on a topic related to communication technology and policy.” The award honors the division’s 1997-1998 research chair, Jung-Sook Lee of the University of Southwestern Louisiana, who died soon after the Baltimore conference in 1998. Authors of the top three student papers will receive a cash award. In addition, the author of the best student paper will have his or her conference registration fee paid by the division. For a paper to be considered for this award, all of the authors must be undergraduate or graduate students enrolled during the 2014-2016 academic year. Authors must type “Jung-Sook Lee Competition” in the upper-right corner of the first page of text to be considered for the award.

Faculty Papers:

The division is pleased to present the annual Gene Burd Top Faculty Research Paper Award, made possible by the generosity of Prof. Burd from the University of Texas – Austin. The $1,000 award recognizes the best faculty paper submitted to the division. For a paper to be considered for this award, at least one of the authors must be faculty. Authors must type “Gene Burd Competition” in the upper-right corner of the first page of text to be considered for the award.

Winners of both awards will receive their prize and be recognized at the San Francisco, CA conference. Submissions that do not win recognition in the Jung- Sook Lee Award or the Gene Burd Award are still considered for acceptance along with open competition submissions. Open Competition: All other papers submitted to the division will be reviewed in an open competition. Please limit papers to no more than 25 pages (doublespaced) in length, excluding tables and references. If you have any questions or require more information about the submission process, please contact Pamela Brubaker, CTEC research chair, at pamela_brubaker@byu.edu

AEJMC-Logo-medium

https://aejmcctec.com/call-for-papers/

 

 

AEJMC 2016 Midwinter Conference Update

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By Pamela J. Brubaker, Ph.D., Brigham Young University

Emerging research from CTEC

February 26-27, 2016

Using social and online media to inform and stay informed

What does social media change? The influence of social media on public affairs news gathering in China (by Liefu Jiang, University of Kansas)

Interviews with students at Chinese universities indicated information seeking, entertainment and socialization are motivations driving students’ use of social media for accessing public affairs news. Chinese students were more likely to access news through their mobile phones.

Campaigning in the age of social media: A content analysis of Twitter use by presidential primary candidates during the 2016 campaign (by Sam Dunklau, Caitlin Slone & Jordan Furiosi, Augustana College)
During the 2016 U.S. presidential primary elections, presidential frontrunners used Twitter as a means of updating their support base with timely, original statuses. Significant differences in the use of Twitter by male and female presidential primary candidates as well as Republican and Democratic candidates were identified, with male candidates more likely to tweet about specific issues and engage in mudslinging than female candidates.

Engaging with social images & video

Top Abstract: Using Instagram to engage with (potential) consumers: A study of Forbes most valuable brands’ use of Instagram (by Jacqueline Skarda-Mitchell, Oluseyi Adegbola, Sherice Gearhart & Althea McMickell, University of Nebraska at Omaha)

Researchers conducted a content analysis of Instagram posts affiliated with companies on the 2014 Forbes Most Valuable Brands list to determine which features drive audience engagement. The data showed audience engagement increases when both products and logos were featured together as well as when hashtags were present in the captions.

Snapchat: A content analysis of themes in screenshots (by Kaitlyn Skinner, Baylor University)

A content analysis of Snapchat screenshots identified in a Google search revealed eight different types of content posted by users (in order of most used): selfies, conversation, nudity or suggestive content, doodles and stickers, status update, humor/parody, internet ugly, and location or geofilter. The results highlight the social aspects of this platform, which is to build relationships.

A theoretical explanation of forming implicit and explicit brand attitudes toward viral video advertising: Effect of emotional tone in messages (by Rahnuma Ahmed, Doyle Yoon & Nazmul Rony, University of Oklahoma)

This proposed study is aimed at contributing to the literature on implicit and explicit attitude formation about brands. The researchers plan to conduct an experiment that explores how viral video ads work and how communicators can make the ads more effective. The study is in development.

Developing more effective communication messages and measurements

Who moved my metrics? New impact measures for journalism and communication research (by Karen Antell, Jody Bales Foote & Joe Foote, University of Oklahoma)

Researchers discussed metrics, other than impact factors, for evaluating electronic-only and open-access journals in six disciplines. Specifically, the value of Google Scholar’s h5-index was highlighted as it provides an impact measure for all journals indexed by Google Scholar. This measure gives researchers a metric to use for gauging the journal’s impact, particularly when the journal is not listed in the annual Journal Citation Reports. Such metrics are increasingly being used to evaluate scholarly impact for the purposes of hiring, tenure, and promotion

Important Tweets matter: Predicting retweets in the #Blacklivesmatter talk on Twitter (by Kate Keib & Itai Himelboim, University of Georgia)

This study utilizes the #Blacklivesmatter movement to examine the role emotion plays in social sharing. Results show that by injecting emotion into the conversation, or in this instance a Tweet, content is more likely to spread.

A theoretical explanation of psychological reactance toward anti-e-cigarette messages on health websites: Effect of perceived message sensation value (PMSV) and restoration postscript (by Rahnuma Ahmed, Doyle Yoon & Nazmul Rony, University of Oklahoma)

In order to create effective anti-e-cigarette messages on interactive platforms like health websites the researchers intend to examine the impact of perceived message sensation value (PMSV) and restoration postscript within a message in order to see if these variables help reduce psychological reactance toward anti-e-cigarette messages. The study is in development.